By the end of the century, the season averaged growing temperature will very likely exceed the highest temperature ever recorded throughout the tropics and subtropics. By 2050, the increase in temperature alone is projected to cause a 20% reduction in the yield of all of the major grains (maize, wheat, rice and soybeans).

The breadbasket countries in the midlatitudes will experience marked increases in year-to-year volatility in crop production. Increasing stresses on the major crops due to climate change, coupled with the increasing demand for food due to increasing population and development, present significant challenges to achieving global food security.

This Carnegie Centenary Professorship lecture, given by David Battisti on 4th November 2014 explores the likely impact of climate change and volatility on food production and availability in the foreseeable future. Watch the video recording.

About Professor David Battisti

David Battisti is The Tamaki Endowed Chair of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington.  

David received a Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences (1988) from the University of Washington. He was an Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin until 1990. Since then, he has been on the Faculty in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington, and has served as the Director of JISAO (1997-2003) and of the UW's Earth Initiative (2003-2006).

Battisti's research is focused on understanding the natural variability of the climate system. He is especially interested in understanding how the interactions between the ocean, atmosphere, land and sea ice lead to variability in climate on time scales from seasonal to decades.

David is one of two Carnegie Centenary Professors in tenure during 2014. His visit to Scotland is hosted by the University of Edinburgh, School of GeoSciences.

Carnegie Centenary Professorships

Carnegie Centenary Professorships aim to attract researchers of the highest academic standing, who will contribute to academic/scientific developments in the Scottish universities in their particular fields, whether in teaching or research or in both, in emerging as well as established disciplines or in interdisciplinary fields. At least two awards are available each year. The next deadline for submitting nominations is 15th July 2015.

Learn more about the scheme or read the profiles of current and recent award holders.

 

 

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